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Casio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You?

HomeWatch TalkCasio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You? Watch TalkCasio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You? It's voting time! Make your favorite G-Shock style heard! by Gerard Nijenbrinks June 02, 2020 MIN READCasio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You? Square Third EyeConsidering a G-Shock with conventional looks and functionality? What would be your preferred style? Square or rounded?
From previous articles, you might have learned that the original DW-5000C-1A G-Shock, presented in 1983, had a more or less squared case design. After that, in 1987, the first round-cased G-Shock model, the DW-5700C, was released. However, it was already 1995 before another truly iconic design would see the light — the DW-6900-1V nicked the Third Eye.
Third Eye was G-Shock’s second iconic designThe Third Eye was composed of earlier designs. It wasn’t just the round shape from the DW-5700C. The Triple Graph dial of the DW-5900C (1992) and the fr..

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Casio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You? It's voting time! Make your favorite G-Shock style heard! by Gerard Nijenbrinks June 02, 2020 MIN READCasio G-Shock, Square, or Third Eye? Which Watch Is For You? Square Third Eye

Considering a G-Shock with conventional looks and functionality? What would be your preferred style? Square or rounded?

From previous articles, you might have learned that the original DW-5000C-1A G-Shock, presented in 1983, had a more or less squared case design. After that, in 1987, the first round-cased G-Shock model, the DW-5700C, was released. However, it was already 1995 before another truly iconic design would see the light — the DW-6900-1V nicked the Third Eye.

Third Eye was G-Shock’s second iconic design

The Third Eye was composed of earlier designs. It wasn’t just the round shape from the DW-5700C. The Triple Graph dial of the DW-5900C (1992) and the front back-light button of the DW-6600 (1994) were equally important to the birth of this icon.

In today’s G-Shock line-up, you’ll find many shapes and models. In this article, I would like to bring it back to the two iconic ones. The Square and the Third Eye. And many of today’s G-Shocks are colorful fashion statements. However, Casio doesn’t forget its humble origins and still offers models that reflect the essence of the G-Shock. Let’s take a look at two — technically up-to-date — models that fit into these iconic shapes and follow the original spirit of G-Shock.

G-Shock GW-6900-1 ‘Third Eye’

G-Shock GW-M5610-1 and GW-6900-1

A Square and a Triple Eye. Of course, both are equally shock- and 200-meter water-resistant (according to ISO 22810). Both sophisticatedly use radio control for timekeeping, as well as solar energy to power the watch. Repeatedly pushing the mode-button, you’ll learn that both models offer the same functions as well. Besides local time and calendar, you’ll find the time in 48 cities, five alarms (plus an hour signal), a 24-hour stopwatch, and a 24-hour countdown timer.

…AE.L and PS

Both watches also share the AE.L auto-backlight. This feature switches the backlight on automatically when you angle the watch towards your face. Additionally, you can find PS power saving on both styles. When turned on, the power saving function causes the watch to enter a sleep state automatically whenever the watch is left in a darkened area for a certain period.

The official Casio G-Shock operation guides of both modules, indicating all functionality, can be found here GW-M5610 / module 3159 and here GW-6900 / module 3179.

GW-6900-1 module indication 3179

Similarities and differences

Let’s get to the point. We’re looking here at two G-Shocks with equally iconic designs. Function-wise they’re similar as well. Even their list price ($130$140) doesn’t seem to be too far apart. What speaks for either of them? Most probably, it will not be the similarities, but the differences that will make you decide which of the two models you like most. So what are these differences?

Size and weight

First of all, of course, the difference in shape, and as a result of that, the sizes. The official Casio information is the following:

  • GW-M5610: Length 46.7 x Width 43.2 x Height 12.7 mm. Weight 51.7 grams.
  • GW-6900: Length 53.2 x Width 50 x Height 17.7 mm. Weight 63 grams.

G-Shock GW-M5610-1 'Square'

G-Shock GW-M5610-1 ‘Square’

I had both watches at hand, and for me, that information was hard to understand or even to believe. On my moderately sized wrist (17.5-18 cm), and despite these rather significant measurement figures, both models are a good fit. So I decided to do the measurements myself; here are the results:

  • GW-M5610: Length 34 x Width 43.5 x Height 12.5 + Lug-to-Lug(*) 39.5 mm. Weight 49.4 grams.
  • GW-6900: Length 44.5 x Width 50 x Height 15.5 + Lug-to-Lug(*) 46 mm. Weight 62.2 grams.

Why the difference in size?

It’s mainly caused by the way the sizes are measured. For the length of a watch, Casio adds the part of the case, which, in fact, is already part of the strap. Measuring a watch with regular lugs, the lugs wouldn’t add to the size of the casing, so I didn’t include it in my measurement. Then — specifically for the GW-6900 — for the height of the watch, Casio included the protective shroud above the light button. To have a better idea of the actual height of the watch as it wears, I didn’t.

GW-M5610-1 module indication 3159

GW-M5610-1 module indication 3159

(*) Lug-to-Lug size is an evermore-requested measurement. I measured the center-to-center distance of the pushpins. The place where the strap attaches to the case.

The truth is that the GW-M5610-1 and GW-6900-1 differ in size and weight. This might make you prefer one over the other. Although, in my opinion, in real life, it doesn’t show as significantly as the measured figures would lead to believe you.

Displays

Although these two watches have the same functionality, the way the information is presented is different. The Third Eye uses its “eyes” to communicate the watch’s settings, as well as for the results of measurements. In the display of the Square, this information is either found as text or indicated with little dashes.

In the display of the Square, if the Auto Backlight is switched on, Daylight Saving Time is activated, a Time Signal has been received, and if Power Saving mode is activated, it is all indicated as text in the display. The state of charge is indicated in dashes above L.M.H. This is also true of information on active functions like Snooze, Alarm, or Hour signal.

The Third Eye display only shows DST and RCVD as text, the other indications are — filled or empty — sections in the three circles — hence Third Eye — above the main display. Another difference is that the day of the week is indicated with three letters (e.g. THU) on the Third Eye models instead of two (TH) in the display of the Square. To me, the display of the Square is easier to see/read which functions are activated. I prefer it to studying the circles of the Third Eye. However, I can imagine that someone might find the display of the latter more attractive.

Appearance and color

Besides the difference in shape, there’s something else that makes these watches differ in appearance. Both the GW-M5610-1 and GW-6900-1 are made in black plastic with a black plastic strap, so that can’t be it. Obviously, it is the colors that are used in the dials which set these models apart. The amount of color used in the dial of the Square GW-M5610-1 — which is inspired by the 1983 original — just makes it pop a bit more. It’s a smaller watch but might attract more attention because of these colors. Some might like that, some might not. But which side are you on? Vote below and let us know your reasoning the comments section too.

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About the author

Gerard Nijenbrinks

Gerard has been in the watch industry for over two decades now. He owned a watch shop in The Hague, The Netherlands, and besides that he has journalistic and photographic activities in the field of watches. Collecting watches since he… read more

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