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Hands-On With The New Grand Seiko SBGP003 Quartz Watch

HomeHands-OnHands-On With The New Grand Seiko SBGP003 Quartz Watch Hands-OnHands-On With The New Grand Seiko SBGP003 Quartz Watch A familiar Grand Seiko aesthetic featuring the brand new 9F85 movement by Jorg Weppelink June 26, 2020 MIN READHands-On With The New Grand Seiko SBGP003 Quartz WatchThroughout the last couple of months, we have witnessed the great appreciation our readers have for the Grand Seiko brand. In our weekly Sunday Showdown series, many of the Grand Seiko models are incredibly popular. And there is more fuel to add to that fire. For 2020 we have seen a string of brand new Grand Seiko models as well as updated models replacing current models in the line-up. With the introduction of the new Grand Seiko SBGP001, SBGP003, SBGP005 models, the brand introduces three new regular models. All of them are powered by the new Grand Seiko 9F85 quartz movement. We go hands-on with the black-dialed Grand Seiko SBGP003.
In the last week of January, Grand Seiko released its highly a..

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Seiko Astron Pays Homage to Original 1969 Quartz Astron In Titanium

Seiko’s Astron collection, from my perspective, is a somewhat overlooked effort from the Japanese brand. I think this is largely in error, however. If a collector is able to get past the non-mechanical aspects of these pieces, I think they offer an enormous amount of functionality in a robust and attractive package. But maybe I’m wrong; maybe there is a surfeit of Seiko Astron collectors out there that I just don’t see. If so, this release is for you.
To commemorate the original 1969 Quartz Astron, Seiko has decided to release a collection of four watches modeled after that original Astron with a curved case, wide lugs, and a thin bezel. Instead of purely quartz, Seiko employed its Caliber 5×53 Solar-powered and GPS-synced movement. This time, however, the cases are made out of titanium, offering a lightweight 42.8mm package. There are four variations in this release, starting with the limited edition SSH071 with its forest green dial and ceramic bezel. Following the limited offering ..

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Watches

Q Timex: A Hands-On Review With A Killer Quartz Watch

HomeHands-OnQ Timex: A Hands-On Review With A Killer Quartz Watch Hands-OnTimexQ Timex: A Hands-On Review With A Killer Quartz Watch Thanks to Timex, no one needs a time machine anymore by Rob NuddsFebruary 28, 2020 MIN READQ Timex: A Hands-On Review With A Killer Quartz WatchNo, don’t worry: You’re not in a time warp. Yes, Timex has just released the Timex M79 Automatic, and yes we know that this is not that model. This is last year’s Q Timex. It’s ready to be reviewed after spending several weeks (in total) on my wrist. And you know what? It’s not half bad…
Let’s get this out of the way fast: The Q Timex is a quartz watch, not a mechanical watch. For those of you that don’t care for quartz, I urge you to stay your clicking finger for just a few minutes more. While I too am rarely one for crystal-regulated heathens, I occasionally make exceptions when the shoe fits. I own (and adore) a Breitling Aerospace. A mechanical version would be pure sacrilege, so I’m aware that feeling can go ..

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Watches

The Enduring Attraction of Excessive-Finish Quartz Manufacturers

Author: Rob NuddsThere was a time in the not-so-distant past that mechanical watchmaking was assumed dead. In the 1970s the quartz movement emerged and all but cannibalized the industry. Hundreds of brands folded and it seemed very likely that the days of mainsprings and balance wheels were in the dirt. And why not? Battery-powered quartz watches were cheaper to produce, more accurate, and seen as futuristic and cool. Mechanical watchmaking had not, up until this point, been seen as a luxury industry. Yes, a good watch carried some social prestige, but only because it was seen as a necessary instrument, and the more opulent your necessities, the more successful you are seen to have been (think cars, houses, and cloths for direct parallels).
No, in those days, mechanical watchmaking existed because it was all there was. When the quartz revolution hit, everyone wanted a piece of the action. Even James Bond ended up with a snazzy LED Hamilton Pulsar on his wrist for Live and Let Die, whic..

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Watches

The Enduring Appeal of High-End Quartz Brands

Author: Rob NuddsThere was a time in the not-so-distant past that mechanical watchmaking was assumed dead. In the 1970s the quartz movement emerged and all but cannibalized the industry. Hundreds of brands folded and it seemed very likely that the days of mainsprings and balance wheels were in the dirt. And why not? Battery-powered quartz watches were cheaper to produce, more accurate, and seen as futuristic and cool. Mechanical watchmaking had not, up until this point, been seen as a luxury industry. Yes, a good watch carried some social prestige, but only because it was seen as a necessary instrument, and the more opulent your necessities, the more successful you are seen to have been (think cars, houses, and cloths for direct parallels).
No, in those days, mechanical watchmaking existed because it was all there was. When the quartz revolution hit, everyone wanted a piece of the action. Even James Bond ended up with a snazzy LED Hamilton Pulsar on his wrist for Live and Let Die, whic..